Nestlé India Executive Board accepting the CRII Most Trusted Brand recognition

At a special session, the Executive Board at Nestlé India Ltd, led by CMD Suresh Narayanan (centre), received the CRII Most Trusted Brand Award from CRII Guild Members, including Abhilash Misra (Director, India and South Asia Outreach, Chicago Booth) and Anupam Kaul (Head, Institute of Quality, Confederation of Indian Industries); Nestlé India India was assessed as being amongst the top-three most-trusted consumer brands on quality in the FMCG industry in the CRII Annual National Consumer Survey; during the ceremony, Nestlé India was also inducted into the esteemed CRII Guild

Dabur India Ltd accepting the CRII Most Trusted Brand recognition

Sunil Duggal, Dabur CEO (second from right) and Byas Anand, Head Communications, Dabur India, accepting the CRII Most Trusted Brand Award, after Dabur India was assessed as being amongst the top-three most-trusted consumer brands on quality in the FMCG industry in the CRII Annual National Consumer Survey; during the ceremony, Dabur India was also inducted into the esteemed CRII Guild

Hindustan Unilever Ltd awarded and inducted into the CRII Guild

After the incorporation of HUL into the CRII Guild, Rajeev Batra, Group Head, Corporate Affairs, HUL, addressing the CRII board on behalf of HUL Chairman and Managing Director, Sanjiv Mehta, while accepting the CRII Most Trusted Brand Award; HUL was assessed as being amongst the top-three most-trusted consumer brands on quality in the FMCG industry in the CRII Annual National Consumer Survey

CRII and University of Chicago Booth School of Business sign a wide ranging MoU

After the momentous signing of the Memorandum of Understanding between CRII and the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, William Kooser (Associate Dean, University of Chicago Booth School of Business) accepts the Confederation Guild testimonial on behalf of Chicago Booth

Union Ministry of MSME, Government of India, being inducted into the Confederation Guild

Honourable Union MSME Minister Sh. Kalraj Mishra (second from right) accepting the CRII Guild testimonial in the presence of (extreme right) Bharath Visweswariah, Executive Director, UChicago Center, New Delhi, India, (extreme left) Kartik Narayan, Executive Director, CRII, and Param Khanna, Executive Director, CRII

Union Ministry of HRD, Government of India, being inducted into the Confederation Guild

(Centre to right) Honourable Union HRD Minister Dr. Ram Shankar Katheria, William Kooser (Associate Dean, University of Chicago Booth School of Business) and Abhilash Misra (Director, India & South Asia Outreach, University of Chicago Booth School of Business)

Foodpanda being inducted into the Confederation Guild

Foodpanda, represented by the Foodpanda India CEO Saurabh Kochhar (center), accepting the CRII Guild testimonial, in the presence of Kartik Narayan (left), Executive Director, Confederation of Retail Industries of India

PolicyBazaar being inducted into the Confederation Guild

PolicyBazaar.com, represented by co-Founder, CFO & COO Alok Bansal (right), accepting the CRII Guild testimonial, in the presence of Rushil Khanna, Executive Director, Confederation of Retail Industries of India

FabFurnish being inducted into the Confederation Guild

Ashish Garg, co-Founder FabFurnish.com, accepting the Confederation Guild testimonial on behalf of FabFurnish.com, in the presence of Param Khanna (left), Executive Director, Confederation of Retail Industries of India

 

ABOUT US

 

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In any developing nation, the growth of the national economy depends critically on coordinated planning between the private and public sector. Such a coordination exercise has to be driven and led by the government through its ministries and various agencies. At the same time, the private sector can contribute to assist such a governmental effort by undertaking coordination exercises within various industries and niche groups in line with the plans and efforts of the government and policy makers. The reason this is critically significant is because the government, however objective oriented it might be, is not endowed with the machinery to undertake a 365x24x7 coordination and planning exercise with all industries operating within the nation. And that is where is realized the importance of private sector groups, federations, agencies, associations, confederations, boards et al which, in their own various areas, promote industrial growth by coordinating various initiatives of their respective industries and market spaces.

During the late 1980s, the Indian economy was at a crossroads. The government at that time was faced with a prepossessing question – of whether to keep the economy protected and close, or to open it up to foreign investments. This was the time when, in the year 1989, a group of medium scale Indian retailers and traders in New Delhi formed an informal working association under the aegis of the Federation of Retailers & Traders. While the Federation was not a large body during those times, the immediate imperative was to provide various retail and trade organizations a unified forum to interact with policymakers and bureaucrats. Given the fact that Indian retail had less than 0.1% of organized players, the setting up of such a unique forum was perhaps most required, specifically with respect to ensuring that for the first time, the government started viewing Indian retail as an important leverage not only to increase the GDP growth of the nation, but most importantly to also contribute to employment growth across the nation.

The year 1991 was a momentous period for the Indian economy as it marked the start of the liberalization era. For the first time, the Indian government formed policies specifically focused at opening up the economy to Foreign Direct Investment and FII investments. Liberalization changed the growth impetus not only of the Indian economy, but specifically also of retail industries. With rising incomes of consumers, companies operating in the retail sector suddenly found themselves faced with burgeoning demand. This sudden spurt in demand was unexpected and led to the influx of various new players in the retail space offering myriad products and services. While branded goods and organized players increased in the retail and associated industries, the majority of goods and services being offered still remained unbranded and unorganized. Yet, there were many advantages that consumers could gain due to increasing competition – low prices, increased choices, improving quality, and higher service standards. There was also the concurrent advantage to the economy, as newer players not only brought investment into the sector, they also created hundreds of thousands of jobs across India. The retail industry opened up new vistas for job seekers having varied educational backgrounds.

At this unique juncture in the Indian economy, in the year 1998, after almost a decade of existence as a medium-scale working group, the Federation of Retailers & Traders decided to restructure its operations and was renamed the Federation of Indian Retailers.

For almost a decade and a half after that, the informal Federation continued to operate as a niche association in in North India. In the year 2013, it was realized by the Federation members that the speed with which the retail industry was growing, had resulted in two imperatives – one, with a considerable number of foreign players and brands entering India, Indian retail did not consist anymore purely of Indian players; two, the whole of India was burgeoning with newer players, and this growth story was not restricted to the North of India, where the focus of the Federation had been till now.

Ergo, in May 2014 – on one hand to position itself as an association that welcomed within its fold both Indian and foreign retail firms operating in India, and on the other to expand its initiatives to those parts of India where the Federation had not earlier focused – the Federation of Indian Retailers underwent a metamorphosis to be formally renamed as the Confederation of Retail Industries of India; it was not only the name, but also the mission and vision statements that underwent a radical transformation, changes which members felt truly represented the legacy, genesis, philosophy, focus and values of the new organization. The newly formed CRII committed itself to ensuring that in the coming years, the Indian retail industry not only learns from global benchmarks in retail manufacturing and service standards, but also creates many such benchmarks of its own.

CRII has been incorporated as a Quality Management Sectional Committee Member, Bureau of Indian Standards, Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Government of India. Current CRII Honorary Guild Members include government ministries like Union Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (Government of India), Union Ministry of Human Resources Development (Government of India), institutions like University of Chicago Booth School of Business, some of the world’s and the nation’s leading retail organizations like Nestlé India Ltd, Hindustan Unilever Ltd, Dabur India Ltd, e-commerce companies like Foodpanda, PolicyBazaar, FabFurnish, and a host of other leading corporations, industry associations, institutions and other organisations.

CRII knowledge partners include the world’s leading research institutions like Harvard Business School (Harvard Working Knowledge), Stanford Graduate School of Business, Cornell University, Tuck School of Business, University of Texas at Austin (McCombs School of Business), Thunderbird School of Global Management, China Europe International Business School, University of Toronto (The Rotman School of Management), IMD Lausanne, UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School and many other stellar organisations.

Some of the world’s most exemplary institutions like The University of Chicago Booth School of Business have entered into wide-reaching Memorandum of Understanding agreements with Confederation of Retail Industries of India for contributing to joint research projects, conducting hallmark events, creating intellectual properties and other significant joint cooperation areas.

To more about how to collaborate with CRII, enter into an MoU with CRII, or become a CRII member, visit our membership page. For any other information or support, write an email to connect@crii.in.

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